Reading Group to Discuss “Sustainable Happiness”

The Transition Marquette County Reading Group will discuss the book “Sustainable Happiness”, edited by Sarah Van Gelder and the staff of “Yes! Magazine”, on Thursday, May 12, at 7pm in the Conference Room at Peter White Public Library in Marquette.

The book starts with a chapter on “How We Lost Track of Real Happiness and Where to Find it Now” and ends with “10 Ways Sustainable Happiness sustainable-happinessCan Change the World.” In between are chapters on “10 Things Science Says Will Make You Happy”, “Why Saying Hello Matters”, “Choose Gratitude”, “Five Ways to Meet Your Neighbors”, “Who Pays the Price for Cheap Stuff”, “Share Meals with Loved Ones”, and more. Twenty-three contributors, including Annie Leonard, Matthieu Ricard, Vandana Shiva, present research, essays, and personal stories suggesting “real well-being is found in supportive relationships and thriving communities, opportunities to make a contribution, and the renewal we receive from a thriving natural world.” “Sustainable Happiness” is ““A thoroughly enjoyable and thought-provoking collection of ideas”, according to Karma Tshiteem, Secretary of the Gross National Happiness Commission of Bhutan.

Anyone is welcome to share in the conversation. It would help to have at least started to read the book. For more information call Charlie at 226-3314 or email mqtchaz@gmail.com

You want fries with that? (Potato order is open!

That’s right – the potato order is open.  Here’s a link to the page – http://www.transitionmqt.org/seed-store-2016/  (Or just click on the “Seed Store 2016” link above!) If you already have a 2016 membership you can just go ahead and place your order.  They should be here around May 8-10.  (We’ll let you know!)  If you haven’t already purchased a $5 annual membership, please add that to your bag as well!

Again this year we will be getting potatoes from Hanson’s Potato Farm in Cornell.  They are $2 a pound.

Thanks!

Reading Group Double Header in April!

The Transition Marquette County Reading Group will have a “double-header” discussion on Thursday, April 14 in the Conference Room at Peter White Public Library in Marquette.

At 1pm we will discuss “The Tao of Vegetable Gardening” by Carol Deppe. It is a fascinating book – she spends the first 70 pages tao of veggiescovering goals and principles and understandings. Chapter One is “Honoring the Land”. Chapter Six is “Non-Doing” and includes sections “On Not Tilling, Digging, Mowing, or Tending Absolutely Everything”, and “On Not Planting Purple Flowers in Front of an Orange Brick House”! She has a list of 37 reasons not to grow a particular vegetable before she finally gets to “Beginning – Tomatoes”. An interesting read for gardeners and non-gardeners alike, the book is laced with wisdom and stories from the Taoist tradition.

At 7pm, there will be an encore discussion of “Station Eleven”, by Emily St. John Mandel, as a part of the Great Michigan Read programming. It’s the story of the Traveling Symphony, a troupe of Shakespearean actors and orchestral musicians travelinstaton eleveng the shoreline of lower Michigan, striving to maintain their humanity in the altered landscape of a world where 99% of the population has been wiped out by a flu pandemic. Dedicating themselves to keeping the remnants of art and humanity alive, their credo is “Survival is insufficient”, but when they arrive in St Deborah by the Water, they encounter a violent prophet who will threaten their existence. Moving back and forth in time, and vividly depicting life before and after the pandemic, St John Mandel skillfully weaves together several stories connected by a strange twist of fate.

Everyone is invited to join us for either or both conversations. It would help to have at least started to read the book. For more information call Charlie at 226-3314 or email mqtchaz@gmail.com.

Seed Swap April 2

A community “Seed Swap” will be held in the lower level of the Peter White Library in Marquette on Saturday, April 2nd, from 11 to 2 pm. (Click here for poster!)  The event is open to everyone — even if you don’t have seeds. Transition Marquette, MQT Growth, and several other organizations have come together to organize a seed swap which offers gardeners and seed savers a chance to exchange seeds and share knowledge. The swap is also an opportunity to learn more about seed saving, and for new seed savers to get locally harvested seeds for starting their own gardens. “If you’re new to this, you don’t even need to bring seeds; just come.” said Michael Riesterer of Transition Marquette Seed Co-op. “We’ll have seeds on hand donated by the Transition Seed Co-op, Seed Savers’ Exchange, and High Mowing Seeds. For experienced seed savers, a seed swap helps growers localize their seed sources which helps build food security.”

To participate in the swap, please bring open-pollinated, non-GMO seeds that are labelled with the plant type, variety, date of harvest, and location of harvest. There will be supplies, such as envelopes, on hand at the event for swapping.

For more information, contact Michael Riesterer at transitionmarquette@gmail.com or call 225-0608.

Reading Group to Discuss “Station Eleven”

The Transition Marquette County Reading Group will discuss the book “Station Eleven”, by Emily St. John Mandel, at 7pm on Thursday,March 10, in the Conference Room at Peter White Public Library in Marquette.

“Station Eleven”, a Great Michigan Read Selection for 2016, is the story of the Traveling Symphony, a troupe of Shakespearean actors and orchestral musicians traveling the shoreline of lower Michigan, striving to maintain their humanity in the altered landscape of a world where 99% of the population has been staton elevenwiped out by a flu pandemic. Dedicating themselves to keeping the remnants of art and humanity alive, their credo is “Survival is insufficient”, but when they arrive in St Deborah by the Water, they encounter a violent prophet who will threaten their existence. Moving back and forth in time, and vividly depicting life before and after the pandemic, St John Mandel skillfully weaves together several stories connected by a strange twist of fate.

Everyone is invited to join us for the conversation. It would help to have at least started to read the book. For more information call Charlie at 226-3314 or email mqtchaz@gmail.com.

Seed Store Is Open!

The Seed Store is Open!

We’ve got a new Superior Collection 2016, and last year’s Superior Collection 2015 at heavily discounted price. We are implementing the new vision – stocking a limited number of seeds and focusing on learning to save seeds to develop a solid inventory of our own seeds in our own community.cropped-seeds.jpg

We also have still viable seeds from previous years at extremely low prices.

It does take a $5 annual membership to shop at the seed co-op. It helps to cover expenses, underwrites our Seeds and Schools programs, and keeps us legal. So check it out, click on the annual membership, and have fun dreaming about this year’s garden. Winter won’t last forever!

Seed Packaging Event

We will be packaging seeds on Wednesday, Feb 10, from 3-7pm at the Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level of Peter White Public Library.  We’ll have some light supper/refreshments, so come when you can, leave when you must – and get a $5 credit for volunteering!

Reading Group – Braiding Sweetgrass, new time

The Reading Group will be discussing Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer.  She is a mother, scientist, decorated professor, and enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation.  This was the diversity read at NMU last year, and Robin Kimmerer spoke on campus.  She calls herself “a traveller between scientific and traditional ways of knowing.”  It’s a beautifully written book about humanity’s relationship to the rest of nature.

We are meeting at a different time this month only, as several of us have tickets to the Jamie Stone concert in the evening.  So we will be meeting at 2pm – same day (Thurs, Feb 11) and same place (Conference Room at Peter White Public Library

Everyone is welcome to join us – it would help if you had at least started to read the book!

 

Transition Events this week – Jan 25-30

This Changes Everything Screened at NMU

There will be a free showing of the Avi Lewis film “This Changes Everything” on Wednesday, Jan 27, at 7pm in Jamrich 1100 on the NMU campus. A companion film to the best selling book by Naomi Klein, the movie shines a light on the human stories in communities living in or near “sacrifice zones.” From the Beaver Lake Cree First Nation’s legal battle against tar sands to South Indian villagers shutting down a proposed coal fired plant, “This Changes Everything” takes us to the front lines in the fight for climate justice.

The showing is free and open to the public, sponsored by Transition Marquette County and the Northern Climate Network at NMU. For more information email mqtchaz@gmail.com or call Charlie at 226-3314.

Biochar Presentation on Friday

Heather Nobert, originally from Marquette and now with the Nebraska Forest Service, will give a talk on production and uses of biochar in room 1320 of Jamrich Hall at NMU on Friday, Jan 29 at noon. According to the Mother Earth News, “By making biochar from brush and other hard to compost organic material, you can improve soil — it enhances nutrient availability and also enables soil to retain nutrients longer.” Ms Nobert has been developing and promoting markets for timber and wood products. She will discuss a range of carbon sequestration possibilities with biochar, from micro-projects for backyard gardeners to industrial level – from the Amazon to Ishpeming. The talk is sponsored by the Northern Climate Network and Transition Marquette County. For more information email mqtchaz@gmail or call Charlie at 226-3314.

Transition Marquette County Reading Group

The Transition Marquette County Reading Group will discuss a Reader’s Choice of works by Dmitry Orlov on Thursday, Jan 14, at 7pm in the Conference Room at Peter White Public Library in Marquette.

In the face of political impotence, resource depletion, and catastrophic climate change, many have become reconciledfive stages to an uncertain future. In “The Five Stages of Collapse – Survivor’s Toolkit”, Orlov describes the progression of collapse, offering a surprisingly optimistic perspective on surviving the sweeping changes of the day with health and sanity intact. In “Reinventing Collapse” he suggests the United States, with runaway debt, a shrinking economy, and environmental catastrophes to rival Chernobyl, is following a similar trajectory to that of the Soviet Union in the early 1980s. By comparing a collapse that has run its course to one that is now unfolding, Orlov holds a unReinventingCollapseique lens up to America’s present and future. “Absolutely Positive” is a collection of 30 essays from his website “ClubOrlov”.

absolutly positive Anyone is welcome to join the conversation. It would help to have at least started to read one of the books. For more information call 226-3314 or email mqtchaz@gmail.com.